The Rule of Order

Youtube: The Rule of Order

Audio: The Rule of Order

Part 5 of Five Steps of The Manifestation Process

“Do calmly, without excitement, whatever the circumstance seems to require. This will lead to the further unfolding of other circumstances in the same direction. By addressing each one as it appears, you are moving step by step toward the accomplishment of your desire.”

Life is all about transformation. A seed is dropped in the ground in one form and it emerges as another. And, “unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit” (John 12:24).

And so it is with the manifestation process. In a very real sense, this process is about dying to one state of being so that another may come forth. As you move from where you are to where you want to be, you must release the old and take on the new.

Watching the new emerge is an exciting process. When you see evidence of your desire beginning to manifest it is easy to become overzealous in your attempt to hurry things along. External action can be addictive. Things begin to happen and you want them to continue and so you may start trying to “push the river” as someone put it. The writer of Psalms also warned against over-zealousness when he wrote, “zeal for thy house has consumed me” (Psalms 69:9).

Every step toward your desired good offers something of value, even in those times when nothing seems to be happening. Hold your vision in an attitude of expectation, enthusiasm and in the knowledge that everything is working together for you good in right and perfect order.

 

The “My Truth” Trap

It’s not uncommon to hear someone justify their opinion by saying, “This is my truth.” The problem is, how many “my truths” are there? Judging by our world population, there are approximately 7.6 billion. Every person alive holds a perspective of what they believe is true. Which of these should you adopt as actually being true?

None.

Why? Because you can never enter the consciousness of another. You cannot adopt their truth as yours. For better or for worse, you’re stuck with you. So, it’s up to you to figure out what works and what doesn’t.

Doing The Work

Five Steps of The Manifestation Process

Audio: Part 4: Doing the Work

Youtube: Part 4: Doing the Work

Wait until some circumstance pointing in the desired direction begins to show itself. It may be small, but it is the type and not the magnitude of the circumstance that is important. This is the first sprouting of the seed.

Chalk it up to my rural Missouri upbringing, but I really appreciate the earthy simplicity of Thomas Troward’s approach. So many writers inject the element of magic into the subject of manifestation, over-looking the fact that we have all been engaged in the manifestation process from the day we were born.

When you set a goal, you are really telling yourself to start paying attention to opportunities, even small ones, that will enable you to move closer to that goal. Creating a vision is really the practice of creating awareness in the direction you want your life to unfold. Without this awareness, opportunities can and do pass by unnoticed.

Troward is pointing to a relaxed awareness, which is very different than a frantic searching for opportunities to further the manifestation of your vision. There are, of course, times when you make things happen. You are inspired with an idea which you act upon until you bring it to a successful conclusion. There are other times when you are presented with ideas that are beyond your comfort zone. You may be tempted to rationalize your hesitancy to pursue it means it is not right for you. This could be the very portion of the manifestation process that has been standing at your door knocking. When you take action, one of two things will happen: either your initial discomfort will begin to dissolve and you’ll find new strength and inspiration, or it will become crystal clear to you that the path represented by the idea is indeed one to be abandoned.

There really are no hard and fast rules concerning the choices you make in the manifestation process. It is a fact that this process is occurring right now and you are steering it with choices you are making. Develop a keen awareness of your choices, and you will find your life unfolding in a way that is much more to your liking.

 

 

 

Event in Toronto

“The Complete Soul”

A 9-Week Video Seminar based on the book by J Douglas Bottorff

Fairview Mall Public Library

35 Fairview Mall Drive, Toronto, ON

Wednesday, September 5th at 7:00 p.m. 2nd floor, room 2 

Thursday, September 6th at 12:30 p.m. 4th floor, room 3

Introduction to Doug and the Seminar” 

In his mid-teens, Doug became fascinated with Unity teachings after he read Dr. Emilie Cady’s book, Lessons In Truth. Doug was and continues to be a genuine “student” of both the spiritual and scientific realms. He is a musician, minister, author and spiritual explorer. He has written several books, and in his latest book, “The Complete Soul,” Doug shares significant realizations that completely changed his spiritual understanding of who he is and what we are.

This Video Series takes a spiritual ‘student’ along the same trail that he blazed on his own personal journey.  These nine videos are beautifully illustrated with examples and metaphors that will resonate with the Truth within you.

If you have ever asked the question, “Who am I?” this Video Seminar promises to open doors inside of you in deeply meaningful ways, showing you who you really are.

Join us Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. or, Thursday afternoon at 12:30 p.m.

 

 

Learning to Love?

Recently I was listening to an interview with a woman who shared the life-changing experience of barely surviving a horrific auto accident. The interviewer asked, “What is your most important take-away from this experience?” The woman responded, “That we learn to love one another.” She said this because she had just described the experience of having momentarily left her body and found herself in an incredible, all-engulfing atmosphere of absolute, unconditional love. It was obvious from her level of passion and humility that she had truly touched a level of love that transcended her ability to describe.

What struck me about her advice of learning to love one another is the fact that she was suggesting that her audience do something she herself had not done. What do I mean by this? I mean she had not learned to love. Her experience transcended all normal learning processes. We can’t learn to love. We can learn to be kind and mindful of the needs of others, but the level of love she was describing is not a thing we do. It’s what we are. It’s an experience of the soul totally unencumbered by normal human wants and needs. A genuine exposure to love gives us a view of our life and all the people from the 30,000 foot vantage point. We don’t love people because they do something to earn it or because we’re trying to be better people. We love because we are love.

I realize this woman was trying to give back something of the gift of experience she received. She had worked out a 3-step plan of ideas that others could intellectually grasp and even implement as a technique that might bring a more loving awareness into their daily life. There are many such proposals laid out in books and lectures that are intended to do the same. But none of it really works, not at the level she was speaking from. Why? Because such techniques do not take us to the place of actual experience that transforms our entire understanding. If we’re trying to love, we’re not coming anywhere close to the experience this woman was trying to convey.

I can describe the experience of an electric shock, so vividly, perhaps, that you can almost feel it. But the actual experience transcends all descriptions. A shock is instant knowledge that bypasses the intellect. In our attempts to describe the experience we must resort to the intellect. Others can read or hear it and say, “I felt like I was shocked too.” But you’re not there unless you too grab those two bare wires.

Using electric shocks to describe the experience of love is probably not the best use of imagery. But you get the point. It’s like believing we can find God in a church or find the living Word of God reading scripture. The church may teach you about God and the scripture can inspire you to open yourself to that live-wire of Spirit that is your soul, but if you stop with the description and even the inspiration it stirs, you’ve settled for technique over actual transforming experience.

I maintain the position that we did not come here to advance our soul through learning how to do things like being more loving. Trying to love is a distraction, as it assumes we, as spiritual beings, are incomplete and must learn things that will complete us. Remembering who and what we are is not the same thing as learning what someone suggests is right for us. The closer you get to a pure experience of your soul, the more you will feel as if you have come home. You and I already have what we’re looking for. We have it because we are it.

Of course we want to be more loving. But we find we are most loving when we are most free. When Jesus said the truth will make you free, I believe he was saying when you know the truth of who you are at the spiritual level, you find the freedom you long for. You’ve come home. You no longer try to be more loving. You love because you can’t help yourself.

The Jesus Factor

[excerpt from The Complete Soul] 

My views of Jesus have changed over the years. I no longer tie his relevance to whether or not he was the miracle worker, the savior who died for my sins, or even the Wayshower who represents all that I might one day become. Through various periods I have seen him through the eyes of the traditional Christian, and I have felt remorse for his death on the cross for my sins. I have also seen him through the eyes of the metaphysical Christian, known the assurance of embracing him as Fillmore’s type-man, the extraordinary example of the person I may someday become.

Despite such a wide range of experience, I made no significant progress in spiritual understanding until I followed the simple instruction of Jesus himself: to go into my inner room and pray to the Father who is in secret.[1] Drawing near the very fountainhead of my being has yielded the most productive spiritual insights. Why take the word of another when it is possible to know and experience God firsthand?

The Jesus I have come to know through my own study and meditative experience is a man who fully discovered and spoke from his soul, a fact that profoundly distinguishes him from the average person. I’m not suggesting he was different in spiritual capacity. He was different in focus and in self-understanding. We have made him into something beyond the reach of the common people he addressed, and I do not believe he would have approved. “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone.”[2] He demonstrated what it is to be a divinely awakened human and pointed out that the things this revelation enabled him to see and do, others could see and do as well.[3]

My change of attitude has not minimized or diminished in the least the role of Jesus as an extraordinary example of spiritual genius. The insights I now glean from many of his sayings have elevated the way I think of others and myself. These insights have caused me to consider why he seemed to have such faith in the spiritual capacity of the common person.

I have concluded that the completeness he found in himself, he also saw in others. He understood how people were blinding themselves to this inner kingdom, and he set himself to the task of encouraging them to open their spiritual eyes. I think of Jesus as one who gave voice to his soul, a voice that we intuitively recognize as it stirs our hidden depths, giving us the eyes to see and the ears to hear the message of a kindred spirit describing a spiritual geography we ourselves presently inhabit. He did not speak of one day reaching a pool of wholeness, but of today taking up our bed of appearance-inspired thinking and walking. He claimed no monopoly on Truth. The revelation of Truth, by his voice or by any voice that speaks it, is a revelation of what is true now and what has always been true of all people for all time.

The words and acts attributed to Jesus are grains of evidence, fossilized remnants if you will, that bear the characteristics of his original, inwardly oriented message. He spoke the language of the soul, the language spoken by mystics through the ages who have transcended religious boundaries. Jesus, and all mystics, have been grossly misunderstood by religious professionals.

“The unspiritual man does not receive the gifts of the Spirit of God, for they are folly to him, and he is not able to understand them because they are spiritually discerned.”[4]

Because the spiritual dimension defies description, those who come to know it cannot find the language to describe the subjective nature of their experience. They have resorted to parable, metaphor, allegory, and simile. Jesus likens this heavenly kingdom to a grain of mustard seed, leaven, treasure hidden in a field, a net thrown into the sea, a householder who brings out his treasure, and so on. These remnants from Jesus’ life are couched and preserved in a matrix of religious trappings that, in all likelihood, share a closer alliance to the teachings and intentions of the early church than to Jesus. Adding to this confusion, the New Testament presents a diversity of views of who Jesus was and what he represented. None of the New Testament writers wrote with the intention of having their work compiled into a single document. Luke, acknowledging a variety of versions of the story of Jesus, took it upon himself to set the record straight:

“Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things which have been accomplished among us, just as they were delivered to us by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word, it seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time past, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus, that you may know the truth concerning the things of which you have been informed.”[5]

Ignoring the independent views of each author, the traditional Christian community has drawn from this diversity of sources to create the single composite of the Jesus that has become familiar to most today. There were other views in ancient times. For example, the Gnostic Christian writings, discovered in a cave in Nag Hammadi, Egypt, in 1945, represent a very different view of Jesus. Though this fringe community embraced a theology foreign to the Christian traditionalist, I am in full agreement with their belief that you must first know yourself at the spiritual level before you can understand a man like Jesus. In The Gospel of Thomas, we find this intriguing observation:

Jesus said, “If your leaders say to you, ‘Look, the (Father’s) kingdom is in the sky,’ then the birds of the sky will precede you. If they say to you, ‘It is in the sea,’ then the fish will precede you. Rather, the (Father’s) kingdom is within you and it is outside you. When you know yourselves, then you will be known, and you will understand that you are children of the living Father. But if you do not know yourselves, then you live in poverty, and you are the poverty.”[6]

That aspect of Christian tradition that considers the individual born in sin and in need of salvation does not place a high premium on self-knowledge. Excluding emphasis on knowing one’s self has led to a level of spiritual poverty unnoticed by those who measure spiritual success by denominational standards rather than by the presence of personal enlightenment. Embracing the view of Jesus transmitted by authority through the centuries requires no degree of self-knowledge. It requires only a profession of faith in the validity of the transmission.

We will not be able to prove definitively who Jesus was or know how he thought of himself. What we can do through an examination of the historical record is observe the centuries-long struggle to hammer out a singular view of Jesus from a multitude of interpretations and know from this that we are not actually seeing the man. We can take from this collective homogenizing effort the cue that allows us to venture beyond the realm of enshrined opinion, beyond the Jesus forced into the service of the professional theologian, and discover the Jesus who strikes that sympathetic chord of our soul.

Our quest for spiritual authenticity provides the heat that separates the slag of orthodoxy and tradition from the precious metal of truth, as relevant today as it was in the day of Jesus. We are left with the task of discerning between the voices of authority and that live wire of Truth that electrifies and enlightens the mystic. “My sheep hear my voice …”[7] is, for me, a kind of knowing wink to those who recognize this language of the soul.

The pure voice of Jesus that I hear rising through the theological mix of the Gospels, the New Testament as a whole and views shared by the unorthodox, is a voice that resonates with my very core. I do not find a Jesus compelling me to follow him on his path, but one that points out that I have my own. I hear him telling me that for this I was born, for this I have come into the world, to bear witness to the truth of my being, to walk the path that is mine alone and no one else’s.

In the same way New Thought has challenged the traditional views held about Jesus, it is appropriate that we question and challenge views considered integral to New Thought logic today. I assume that Jesus encouraged his listeners to do little more than follow him in shedding the dogmatic beliefs of religious orthodoxy. I believe he encouraged people to discover for themselves the truth of their spiritual nature, which provides the strongest, most profound catalyst for change at the fundamental level of one’s being.

[1] Matthew 6:6

[2] Mark 10:18

[3] John 14:12

[4] 1 Corinthians 2:14

[5] Luke 1:1-4

[6] The Gospel of Thomas, #3

[7] John 10:27